Project Types

Australian Projects


Australia is home to a diverse range of carbon offset projects from those rebuilding and protecting natural landscapes, biodiversity and agriculture, to those offering emission reduction opportunities for commercial and industrial facilities and operations.

With Australia’s significant land mass and abundant natural resources comes the opportunity for our nation to scale up our carbon offsetting project capacity and turn the nation’s domestic carbon offsets industry into a force for international competitiveness and leadership in the creation of high quality, low sovereign risk carbon credits and associated benefits.

Australian carbon offset projects are governed by different national and international methods, legislation and international standards, and consequently generate a variety of different carbon credits units that are accepted under national legislation and fungible in international markets. For more information on the different carbon credits units eligible in the Australian market and under locally used carbon neutrality programs click here.

Agricultural projects can reduce the amount of methane and carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere from agricultural processes. There are many types of agricultural projects that can be developed, including soil carbon, piggery, dairy and crop (cotton) irrigation.

Many farms are mixed use so often it is more effective for one farm to be developing several different projects simultaneously to reduce emissions across the whole farm.

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Energy Efficiency projects reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing consumption of electricity and natural gas. Energy Efficiency projects can take many different forms including commercial and public lighting upgrades; refrigeration and ventilation efficiencies; fuel, electricity and appliance efficiency; and commercial building upgrades.

learn more

Facility-wide projects in Australia are developed using data from the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (NGER) scheme to encourage abatement from a wide range of activities. These activities are developed on an individual basis depending on the size, type and location of a facility, such as manufacturing plants, refineries, or coal generated power stations.

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Landfill and alternative waste treatment projects avoid emissions through operation of landfill or alternative waste treatment facilities. These projects can vary from facility to facility based on the method of waste treatment used, or the size and location of the landfill.

learn more

Industrial Fugitive projects, specifically in the Mining, oil and gas industries reduce emissions by the re-routing and flaring or combustion of waste or fugitive emissions from coal mining and oil and gas extraction and processing facilities.

learn more

Transport projects reduce emissions from the transport sector. Project efficacy and detail will change depending on the type of transport in question including automotive, rail, sea and air transport. Generally these projects focus on heavy emitting or aggregated model activites from industrial transport activities (freight or heavy haulage) rather than single personal use vehicle emissions reduction projects.

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Savanna burning methods reduce methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) released by fire into the atmosphere through the use of strategic early dry season fire management techniques across savannas in the tropical north of Australia.

Savanna burning as a source of emissions reductions is built on ancient Aboriginal fire management techniques that reduce fuel loads and create burnt fire breaks in the landscape. Fire breaks alongside roads or water courses help to reduce the risk of hot fires spreading in the late dry season.

learn more

Vegetation projects generate abatement by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it as carbon in plants as they grow. Examples of vegetation activities include reforestation, revegetation, or protecting native forest or vegetation that is at imminent risk of clearing (avoided deforestation).

learn more

Australian Projects


Australia is home to a diverse range of carbon offset projects from those rebuilding and protecting natural landscapes, biodiversity and agriculture, to those offering emission reduction opportunities for commercial and industrial facilities and operations.

With Australia’s significant land mass and abundant natural resources comes the opportunity for our nation to scale up our carbon offsetting project capacity and turn the nation’s domestic carbon offsets industry into a force for international competitiveness and leadership in the creation of high quality, low sovereign risk carbon credits and associated benefits.

Australian carbon offset projects are governed by different national and international methods, legislation and international standards, and consequently generate a variety of different carbon credits units that are accepted under national legislation and fungible in international markets. For more information on the different carbon credits units eligible in the Australian market and under locally used carbon neutrality programs click here.

Agricultural projects can reduce the amount of methane and carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere from agricultural processes. There are many types of agricultural projects that can be developed, including soil carbon, piggery, dairy and crop (cotton) irrigation.

Many farms are mixed use so often it is more effective for one farm to be developing several different projects simultaneously to reduce emissions across the whole farm.

learn more

Facility-wide projects in Australia are developed using data from the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (NGER) scheme to encourage abatement from a wide range of activities. These activities are developed on an individual basis depending on the size, type and location of a facility, such as manufacturing plants, refineries, or coal generated power stations.

learn more

Transport projects reduce emissions from the transport sector. Project efficacy and detail will change depending on the type of transport in question including automotive, rail, sea and air transport. Generally these projects focus on heavy emitting or aggregated model activites from industrial transport activities (freight or heavy haulage) rather than single personal use vehicle emissions reduction projects.

learn more

Vegetation projects generate abatement by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it as carbon in plants as they grow. Examples of vegetation activities include reforestation, revegetation, or protecting native forest or vegetation that is at imminent risk of clearing (avoided deforestation).

learn more

Energy Efficiency projects reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing consumption of electricity and natural gas. Energy Efficiency projects can take many different forms including commercial and public lighting upgrades; refrigeration and ventilation efficiencies; fuel, electricity and appliance efficiency; and commercial building upgrades.

learn more

Industrial Fugitive projects, specifically in the Mining, oil and gas industries reduce emissions by the re-routing and flaring or combustion of waste or fugitive emissions from coal mining and oil and gas extraction and processing facilities.

learn more

Landfill and alternative waste treatment projects avoid emissions through operation of landfill or alternative waste treatment facilities. These projects can vary from facility to facility based on the method of waste treatment used, or the size and location of the landfill.

learn more

Savanna burning methods reduce methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) released by fire into the atmosphere through the use of strategic early dry season fire management techniques across savannas in the tropical north of Australia.

Savanna burning as a source of emissions reductions is built on ancient Aboriginal fire management techniques that reduce fuel loads and create burnt fire breaks in the landscape. Fire breaks alongside roads or water courses help to reduce the risk of hot fires spreading in the late dry season.

learn more

Australian Projects


Australia is home to a diverse range of carbon offset projects from those rebuilding and protecting natural landscapes, biodiversity and agriculture, to those offering emission reduction opportunities for commercial and industrial facilities and operations.

With Australia’s significant land mass and abundant natural resources comes the opportunity for our nation to scale up our carbon offsetting project capacity and turn the nation’s domestic carbon offsets industry into a force for international competitiveness and leadership in the creation of high quality, low sovereign risk carbon credits and associated benefits.

Australian carbon offset projects are governed by different national and international methods, legislation and international standards, and consequently generate a variety of different carbon credits units that are accepted under national legislation and fungible in international markets. For more information on the different carbon credits units eligible in the Australian market and under locally used carbon neutrality programs click here.

Agricultural projects can reduce the amount of methane and carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere from agricultural processes. There are many types of agricultural projects that can be developed, including soil carbon, piggery, dairy and crop (cotton) irrigation.

Many farms are mixed use so often it is more effective for one farm to be developing several different projects simultaneously to reduce emissions across the whole farm.

learn more

Energy Efficiency projects reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing consumption of electricity and natural gas. Energy Efficiency projects can take many different forms including commercial and public lighting upgrades; refrigeration and ventilation efficiencies; fuel, electricity and appliance efficiency; and commercial building upgrades.

learn more

Facility-wide projects in Australia are developed using data from the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (NGER) scheme to encourage abatement from a wide range of activities. These activities are developed on an individual basis depending on the size, type and location of a facility, such as manufacturing plants, refineries, or coal generated power stations.

learn more

Industrial Fugitive projects, specifically in the Mining, oil and gas industries reduce emissions by the re-routing and flaring or combustion of waste or fugitive emissions from coal mining and oil and gas extraction and processing facilities.

learn more

Landfill and alternative waste treatment projects avoid emissions through operation of landfill or alternative waste treatment facilities. These projects can vary from facility to facility based on the method of waste treatment used, or the size and location of the landfill.

learn more

Savanna burning methods reduce methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) released by fire into the atmosphere through the use of strategic early dry season fire management techniques across savannas in the tropical north of Australia.

Savanna burning as a source of emissions reductions is built on ancient Aboriginal fire management techniques that reduce fuel loads and create burnt fire breaks in the landscape. Fire breaks alongside roads or water courses help to reduce the risk of hot fires spreading in the late dry season.

learn more

Transport projects reduce emissions from the transport sector. Project efficacy and detail will change depending on the type of transport in question including automotive, rail, sea and air transport. Generally these projects focus on heavy emitting or aggregated model activites from industrial transport activities (freight or heavy haulage) rather than single personal use vehicle emissions reduction projects.

learn more

Vegetation projects generate abatement by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it as carbon in plants as they grow. Examples of vegetation activities include reforestation, revegetation, or protecting native forest or vegetation that is at imminent risk of clearing (avoided deforestation).

learn more

Australian Projects


Australia is home to a diverse range of carbon offset projects from those rebuilding and protecting natural landscapes, biodiversity and agriculture, to those offering emission reduction opportunities for commercial and industrial facilities and operations.

With Australia’s significant land mass and abundant natural resources comes the opportunity for our nation to scale up our carbon offsetting project capacity and turn the nation’s domestic carbon offsets industry into a force for international competitiveness and leadership in the creation of high quality, low sovereign risk carbon credits and associated benefits.

Australian carbon offset projects are governed by different national and international methods, legislation and international standards, and consequently generate a variety of different carbon credits units that are accepted under national legislation and fungible in international markets. For more information on the different carbon credits units eligible in the Australian market and under locally used carbon neutrality programs click here.

Agricultural projects can reduce the amount of methane and carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere from agricultural processes. There are many types of agricultural projects that can be developed, including soil carbon, piggery, dairy and crop (cotton) irrigation.

Many farms are mixed use so often it is more effective for one farm to be developing several different projects simultaneously to reduce emissions across the whole farm.

learn more

Facility-wide projects in Australia are developed using data from the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (NGER) scheme to encourage abatement from a wide range of activities. These activities are developed on an individual basis depending on the size, type and location of a facility, such as manufacturing plants, refineries, or coal generated power stations.

learn more

Energy Efficiency projects reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing consumption of electricity and natural gas. Energy Efficiency projects can take many different forms including commercial and public lighting upgrades; refrigeration and ventilation efficiencies; fuel, electricity and appliance efficiency; and commercial building upgrades.

learn more

Industrial Fugitive projects, specifically in the Mining, oil and gas industries reduce emissions by the re-routing and flaring or combustion of waste or fugitive emissions from coal mining and oil and gas extraction and processing facilities.

learn more

Landfill and alternative waste treatment projects avoid emissions through operation of landfill or alternative waste treatment facilities. These projects can vary from facility to facility based on the method of waste treatment used, or the size and location of the landfill.

learn more

Savanna burning methods reduce methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) released by fire into the atmosphere through the use of strategic early dry season fire management techniques across savannas in the tropical north of Australia.

Savanna burning as a source of emissions reductions is built on ancient Aboriginal fire management techniques that reduce fuel loads and create burnt fire breaks in the landscape. Fire breaks alongside roads or water courses help to reduce the risk of hot fires spreading in the late dry season.

learn more

Transport projects reduce emissions from the transport sector. Project efficacy and detail will change depending on the type of transport in question including automotive, rail, sea and air transport. Generally these projects focus on heavy emitting or aggregated model activites from industrial transport activities (freight or heavy haulage) rather than single personal use vehicle emissions reduction projects.

learn more

Vegetation projects generate abatement by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it as carbon in plants as they grow. Examples of vegetation activities include reforestation, revegetation, or protecting native forest or vegetation that is at imminent risk of clearing (avoided deforestation).

learn more

International Projects


Although the types of carbon offset projects available in Australia can be found elsewhere in the world, there are a number of project types that are more common internationally. These projects are focused on supporting sustainable development goals for natural landscapes and inhabited regions in developing countries. Additionally, some project types are focused on enabling local developing communities to support and protect natural environments that are unique to their geological location around the planet (particularly large areas of tropical rainforests that are critical to global CO2 sequestration efforts).

Clean cookstove projects ensure that safe and affordable clean cooking solutions can be provided to families and communities in developing countries to counteract the devastating health and environmental effects that come from using open fires and traditional stoves to cook.

Of the three billion people around the world relying on solid fuels to cook, women and children are affected the most; according to the World Health Organization, household air pollution from cooking kills over 4 million people every year and sickens millions more. Clean cookstove projects can dramatically reduce fuel consumption and exposure to harmful cookstove smoke, while providing economic opportunities in communities around the world.

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REDD+ stands for countries’ efforts to  reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and foster conservation, sustainable management of forests, and enhancement of forest carbon stocks. In 2013 at COP19 in Warsaw, the Conference of Parties oversaw the development of the Warsaw Framework for REDD+ which oversees globally the support and implementation of projects around the world. These projects include initiatives focused on capacity building, demonstration activities, addressing the drivers of deforestation and mobilization of resources to support and protect natural environments across the globe.

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View Sample Project
Renewable energy projects look to create low carbon or zero carbon energy from sources that never run out or are constantly replenished through the natural cycles of the environment. The most recognisable renewable energy projects take advantage of wind, solar and hydropower, however there are numerous other renewable energy sources that are being harvested in projects around the world including geothermal, bio-energy and ocean (tidal) power to generate heat and/or electricity. In Australia, renewable energy projects generate Renewable Energy Certificates and are accounted for as part of Australia’s emissions reductions challenge in a different way.

In the developing world, renewable energy projects allow for the creation of carbon credits as well as helping communities to leapfrog fossil fuel technologies and break free from the poverty cycle.

learn more
View Sample Project
Clean water access is a challenge throughout the developing world. Water filter projects are part of the solution. They protect against illness and are more cost-effective and sustainable than boiling or purchasing bottled water. Wate filtration is one of the may ways that water projects are improving lives of people in developing countries, whilst simultaneously reducing demand for wood or coal as a fuel to purify water by boiling it.
learn more
View Sample Project

Clean cookstove projects ensure that safe and affordable clean cooking solutions can be provided to families and communities in developing countries to counteract the devastating health and environmental effects that come from using open fires and traditional stoves to cook.

Of the three billion people around the world relying on solid fuels to cook, women and children are affected the most; according to the World Health Organization, household air pollution from cooking kills over 4 million people every year and sickens millions more. Clean cookstove projects can dramatically reduce fuel consumption and exposure to harmful cookstove smoke, while providing economic opportunities in communities around the world.

learn more
View Sample Project

REDD+ stands for countries’ efforts to  reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and foster conservation, sustainable management of forests, and enhancement of forest carbon stocks. In 2013 at COP19 in Warsaw, the Conference of Parties oversaw the development of the Warsaw Framework for REDD+ which oversees globally the support and implementation of projects around the world. These projects include initiatives focused on capacity building, demonstration activities, addressing the drivers of deforestation and mobilization of resources to support and protect natural environments across the globe.

learn more
View Sample Project
Renewable energy projects look to create low carbon or zero carbon energy from sources that never run out or are constantly replenished through the natural cycles of the environment. The most recognisable renewable energy projects take advantage of wind, solar and hydropower, however there are numerous other renewable energy sources that are being harvested in projects around the world including geothermal, bio-energy and ocean (tidal) power to generate heat and/or electricity. In Australia, renewable energy projects generate Renewable Energy Certificates and are accounted for as part of Australia’s emissions reductions challenge in a different way.

In the developing world, renewable energy projects allow for the creation of carbon credits as well as helping communities to leapfrog fossil fuel technologies and break free from the poverty cycle.

learn more
View Sample Project
Clean water access is a challenge throughout the developing world. Water filter projects are part of the solution. They protect against illness and are more cost-effective and sustainable than boiling or purchasing bottled water. Wate filtration is one of the may ways that water projects are improving lives of people in developing countries, whilst simultaneously reducing demand for wood or coal as a fuel to purify water by boiling it.
learn more
View Sample Project

Kariba REDD+ Project, Zimbabwe

Video commissioned by, and included with permission from South Pole Group.

Huoshui Grouped Hydropower Project, China

Video commissioned by, and included with permission from South Pole Group.

Kariba REDD+ Project, Zimbabwe

Video commissioned by, and included with permission from South Pole Group.

Huoshui Grouped Hydropower Project, China

Video commissioned by, and included with permission from South Pole Group.